Tag Archives: social change

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Detailed Schedule Narrating (in) Community Colleges this Friday, May 2nd!

Fri May 2, 10:00am – 4:00pm | A Day of Discussion | @The Graduate Center
10-10:15: Coffee/welcome (Sylvia Scribner Conference Room 6304.01)
10:15 – 11:00 Community Voice Research Project – Diverse Perspectives on the Role of the Community College
11- 12: DREAMers Speak: Narratives of DREAM Act Students
Lunch 12 – 1 @ Center for Globalization and Social Change (Rm 5109)
Afternoon Sessions on C Level 198
1:00-2:00 Continuing conversation: Findings from our “Community Voice” research project  – with open discussion and activity session; discussion of the findings with data in hand and implications for practice and policy.
2:15-3:15: No Divide: A Project for Personalizing Academic Writing – campus-wide writing project
3:15-4:00 New Narratives, New Directions: Taking the Next Steps
4-5 Wine & Cheese! Reception @ Center for Place, Culture, and Politics (Rm6107)

Cosponsored by the Narrating Change Seminar in the Humanities, Center for Place, Culture, and Politics, Center for Globalization and Social Change and the Human Development, Psychology Training Area.

…..event description

 

Discussions led by a number of Graduate Center and Community College faculty and students (in alphabetical order):

 

Possibility and Hegemony in Student Expression, Friday, December 6, GC@ 5:30pm

Narrating Change Seminar

Possibility and Hegemony in Student Expression

Friday, December 6th, 5:30pm

Room 6304.01, PhD Program in Psychology

repost from Center for the Humanities  

 narrating hegemony What are the privileged – hegemonic – ways of knowing and being underlying our public educational system? In contrast, what are the students’ ‘alternative’ expressive skills, often overseen or disregarded in the educational setting? How do these questions relate to the problem of perpetuating inequality in our society? Join Professors Christopher Emdin, Angela Reyes and Debangshu Roychoudhury along with Julio Marquez, and Chante Reid for a conversation about the developmental and pedagogical repercussions of inviting or dismissing students’ alternative discursive skills.

Co-sponsored by Narrating Change Seminar

 

 

Free and open to the public. All events take place at The Graduate Center, CUNY, 365 Fifth Ave btwn 34th & 35th. The building and the venues are fully accessible. For more information please visit http://centerforthehumanities.org/ or call 212.817.2005 or e-mail ch@gc.cuny.edu

 

 

Editorial on Roma in the Times

excerpted from the Times:

THE OPINION PAGES | EDITORIAL

Scapegoating the Roma, Again

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD OCT. 17, 2013

The Roma, sometimes called Gypsies, have been part of the European cultural landscape for centuries. They have also suffered greatly from discrimination and prejudice, particularly in times of economic crisis, when they become scapegoats.

That is happening now. Faced with stubbornly high unemployment and strained budgets, some European Union members are finding it easier to stigmatize and expel Roma than to provide them with the education, housing and employment they seek.

In London, a Roma camp was dismantled over the summer and most of its residents sent back to Romania. In the Czech Republic, Roma children are still routinely segregated in schools. In Sweden, revelations that the police kept a secret registry of Roma families touched off a national storm.

Continue reading the full Times editorial

and come join the conversation with the Narrating Change Seminar @The Graduate Center

Narrating Reform: Roma Educators Narrate Social Inclusion in Europe

Oct 22, 2013, 6:30pm
The Skylight Room (9100)

Tünde Kovacs-CerovicJordan NaidooColette Daiute

And

Discussion of the Report: “Roma Educators Narrate Reform”

@The Graduate Center,  October 23, 2:00 – 4:00

Please write to cdaiute@gc.cuny.edu for the report and the room number.

 

Károly BARI, Autobiography of a Cherub
Károly BARI, Autobiography of a Cherub

repost from The Center for the Humanities:

“Social inclusion” is a promise and issue of heated negotiation across Europe, where dramatically changing populations are the result of economic migration, displacement by war and revolution, poverty, and other exclusions. Eleven million Roma in diverse communities are living in marginalized conditions that are central to policies and politics of social inclusion. The Decade of Roma Inclusion, 2005-2015, declared by 13 countries across Eastern Europe to provide an agenda and resources has prompted an education reform (among reforms in health and housing). The Pedagogical Assistant Program in Serbia is a dynamic effort revolving around self-determination by Roma through professional participation in education.  Join us for a presentation and discussion of goals, activities, and tensions in this education reform, with examples from research highlighting perspectives of the Roma teaching assistants.

 

tinda
Tünde Kovacs-Cerovic, Professor of Educational Psychology & Education Policy at Belgrade University
Jordan Naidoo, Senior Education Advisor at UNICEF
Jordan Naidoo, Senior Education Advisor at UNICEF
Colette Daiute, Professor of Psychology at The Graduate Center, CUNY.
Colette Daiute, Professor of Psychology at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cosponsored by the Narrating Change Seminar in the Humanities.

 

 

 

When Mother Comes Home for Christmas

When Mother Comes Home for Christmas

Oct 9, 2013, 7:00pm
Martin E. Segal Theatre

Sujatha Fernandes, Nilita Vachani

Join film director Nilita Vachani for a screening and discussion of her documentary film, “When Mother Comes Home for Christmas,” which tells the story of a Josephine Perera, abandoned by her husband with three small children, who is one of thousands of Sri Lankan women who have left their country to earn salaries as domestic workers abroad.Sujatha Fernandes will moderate a discussion with the filmmaker following the screening.

This event emerged from Narrating Labor Struggles: Storytelling and Social Change, which can be viewed in our archive.

When Mother Comes Home

Cosponsored by The Center for Place, Culture and Politics and the Narrating Change Seminar in the Humanities

Narrating Labor Struggles: Storytelling and Social Change

Apr 17, 2013, 6:00pm | Room C197

Christine LewisMark NowakNilita Vachani Sujatha Fernandes

Repost from The Center for the Humanities:

How can the power of storytelling build public awareness of the struggles of immigrant and low-wage workers? In recent years, storytelling has proven a strong tool for achieving social change, and this practice has been particularly prevalent among immigrants and low wage workers. This panel will bring together director and filmmaker Nilita Vachani, who has documented the stories of immigrant workers, Christine Lewis, a domestic worker activist who used storytelling in the groundbreaking Domestic Worker Bill of Rights campaign, and the award-winning poet and writer Mark Nowak who works with immigrant social movement organizations. Moderated by Sujatha Fernandes.

 

Cosponsored by the Narrating Change Seminar in the Humanities, Women’s Studies, and the Center for Place, Culture and Politics.